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Michel ZandorocnyjHouse of Representatives Bill, H.R. 87, introduced by Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn. back in January, called for the full repeal of the Dodd-Frank Act (DFA).  As one would expect a repeal to be worded, the bill’s text simply states, “The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Public Law 111–203) is repealed and the provisions of law amended by such Act are revived or restored as if such Act had not been enacted.”

Oddly, even with Republican leadership in the House, the bill seemed to lack any serious momentum. There are, however, two nearly identical Senate bills, S. 712 and S. 746, introduced by Sen. Jim DeMint [R-SC] and Sen. Richard Shelby [R-AL], respectively, that have really started to gain support.  In fact both bills have the backing of the entire Republican Senate. But will it be enough?  Right now – not likely. Remember that in the Senate, the Republicans are still the Minority party – just ask Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose title serves as a daily reminder.

Without winning over any Senate Democrats, neither bill will likely see the light of day. But, let’s just say they do indeed pick up some votes from the Democrats, and the bill passes – they still need to get it through the House.  This is fun! Ok, now let’s pretend that by some stroke of luck the bill squeaks past the House and now sits on the President’s desk. Come on – you know it’s veto time! There is absolutely no way that President Obama will let this go, and if you remember your civics lessons (Do they still teach that?), both Houses would need to pass it with a two-thirds majority to make it stick. Now, with that, we are stretching the boundaries of reality.

What’s likely is Congress will not increase the CFTC’s and SEC’s budgets. In the current economic climate, that really shouldn’t be a surprise. In fact, Congress intends to slash the agencies’ budgets (see my March 23rd article). This will effectively hamper rule making and regulatory oversight as CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler has pointed out while relentlessly pleading for more funding.

As I see it, the killing off of DFA is not going to happen. As the DFA deadlines draw near, we may see some amendments to the legislation. I believe that Congress will be receptive to revise disputed sections of the Act, but to a wholesale repeal – no way.

So, for now, don’t go dumping any plans relating to compliance. Remember, a bill is just a bill, but right now, Dodd-Frank is law.